English Courses

17TH CENTURY BRITISH LITERATURE ENG 360 CX ENG (4.00 credits)
A survey of selected writers of late Renaissance and 17th century Britain, from the Stuart period through the English Civil War and the Restoration. This tumultuous and action-packed age was filled with unparalleled achievements in the theatre, milestones in publishing, political and religious unrest, the beginnings of global trade, and colonization of the New World. The course will include authors such as Jonson, Donne, Marvell, Wroth, and Milton. This course contributes to the pre-1865 literature requirement. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
ADVANCED FICTION WRITING ENG 406 BX ENG (4.00 credits)
This is an advanced fiction writing workshop for students interested in writing short stories or chapters of a novel. While the emphasis is on realistic fiction, students may choose to write in various genres such as science fiction, fantasy, or mystery. Students will also read and analyze stories by both established writers and accomplished student writers. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 205.
ADVANCED JOURNALISM ENG 410 ENG (4.00 credits)
A project-oriented seminar for long investigative projects. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 201.
ADVANCED WRITING WORKSHOP ENG 476 ENG (4.00 credits)
Directed study in the writing of various literary forms, such as the informal essay, nature writing, scriptwriting, genre fiction, the long poem, the novella, or other forms. Prerequisites: ENG 205.
AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1865 ENG 367 CX ENG (4.00 credits)
Encompassing a wide range of literary movements and authors from the 1600s through the end of the American Civil War in 1865, this course may be organized as a survey course looking at writers from each period or may focus on one or more periods in depth. From the early settlers seeking religious or economic freedoms to the tumultuous revolutionary period to the establishment of a distinctive American literature and culture in the nineteenth century, the territories that became the United States forged new political and social frontiers that are reflected in a wide range of imaginative literary works. This course contributes to the pre-1865 literature requirement. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
AMERICAN LITERATURE,1865-1914 ENG 368 ENG (4.00 credits)
This course begins with the post-Civil War period of tumult and moves through the rise of realism in the late nineteenth century and Modernism in the early twentieth century. Writers in this period struggled to find innovative ways to get at the basic truths of life experience by experimenting with new forms of writing and new subjects to examine. This period of radical thinking and cultural revolutions produced creative experiments from Mark Twain, Henry James, Kate Chopin, Gertrude Stein, and T. S. Eliot among many others. This course may look at a survey from all periods or choose to focus in more depth on one or more periods. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
ASIAN AMERICAN WRITERS ENG 325A CDQ ENG (4.00 credits)
This course offers a study of selected works of various genres (e.g., fiction, poetry, drama, and film) by Asian American women and men of diverse ethnicities. Emphasizing the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality, and informed by critical studies of race and ethnicity, feminist criticism, and cultural studies, we will explore the following main questions: What are the major themes and issues in Asian American literature and literary studies? What textual strategies do Asian American writers employ to represent Asian American self-identities and cultural politics? In what ways do these writers challenge or accommodate dominant representations of Asian American women and men as raced and gendered subjects? In what ways do the subject positions of the writers, characters, and readers impact our understanding of Asian American texts? Cross-listed:ETHS 325A. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 110.
BASIC WRITING SKILLS ENG 099B ENG (2.00 credits)
Focuses on developing skills needed for college-level writing. Students required to take ENG 99 must complete it before enrolling in ENG 110. Credit does not count toward graduation requirements. (Enrollment by placement.) Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
BASIC WRITING SKILLS ENG 099C ENG (2.00 credits)
Continuation of skills taught in ENG 099B for students who are recommended to take it by their instructor. Permission of instructor. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
BLACK WOMEN WRITERS ENG 415A CDQ ENG (4.00 credits)
This course offers a study of selected novels, short stories, and essays by African American women writers in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Emphasizing the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality, and informed by critical studies of race and ethnicity and Black feminist criticism, we will explore the following main questions: What are the major themes and issues in Black women’s literature? What textual strategies do African American women writers employ to represent Blackness, womanhood, and Black womanhood? In what ways do these writers challenge or accommodate dominant discourses of race, gender, class, and sexuality? What does it mean to be a Black feminist reader, and what does it mean for non-Black and/or non-female readers to interpret Black women’s writings? Prerequisite: Eng 110. Cross-listed: ETHS 415A
COLLEGE WRITING ENG 110 W ENG (4.00 - 5.00 credits)
This first-year course integrates critical reading and writing skills. Course topics will vary, but every section will emphasize academic writing. Students will develop competence in finding and using source materials, and in writing research papers. Individual conferences, peer reading, and revision are some of the essential elements in this process-oriented approach to college writing. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 099; OKE 110.
ENVIRONMENTAL LITERATURE ENG 395 CEX ENG (4.00 credits)
This course covers literature that puts the environment at the center of discourse and considers humans as part of (rather than apart from) nature and ecosystems. Specific iterations of the course might focus on nature writing, urban environments, deep ecology, eco-feminism, eco-criticism, and/or activist literature.  Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
FICTION WRITING ENG 305 BX ENG (4.00 credits)
This is a writer's workshop for students interested in writing short fiction. The student's own original stories will be analyzed and discussed in both peer-review groups and an all-class workshop setting. In addition to writing stories of their own, students will be expected to write short critical responses to all work by their peers. Students will also read and analyze stories by professional writers. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 205.
FILM STUDIES TOPICS ENG 246 A ENG (4.00 credits)
A course in film analysis that focuses on both form and content. Different methodological and theoretical approaches to film studies will be employed to explore specific topics that might include the New Documentary, American Romantic Film Comedy, or Blockbuster Studies.
FOC STUD: ETHNIC AM STUDIES-SLAVERY ENG 443B CDX ENG (4.00 credits)
This course will examine a range of scenes of slavery as depicted in literary fiction, period accounts, historical documentation, photography and other imagery, and critical theory. This range of texts and images will reveal the lived experiences of slaves across time periods and different geographic locations. We will examine how slaves were transported to the Americas (particularly North America), how their enslavement was achieved materially and psychologically, how their bodies were treated and abused, how they were viewed by sympathizers and opponents of slavery, how the idea of slavery figured in debates about the establishment of the new United States, how they revolted and rebelled and how these rebellions were quashed, how they were controlled through legal and cultural circumscription, how they sought control of their own circumstances and destinies, how they sought escape and sometimes succeeded, and how they wrote accounts of their experiences in an effort to be heard. Cross-listed: ETHS 443B. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 110.
FOCUSED STD LIT CRIT: CNTM GLOB FEM ENG 480A GQU ENG (4.00 credits)
This course is an exploration of the methods, concepts, and experiences of feminism as it is practiced all over the world in different ways. The historical development and cultural mappings of feminism since the second wave will be our main concern, but we will maintain specificity by focusing on particular locations, and on locational concerns. Feminist theorists from a variety of disciplines including philosophy, literature, political science, history and sociology will provide groundwork for our explorations, which will be filled out through case studies, historical texts and literary narratives. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag and ENG 280 or ENG 281.
FOCUSED STUDY OF LITERARY CRITICISM ENG 480 ENG (4.00 credits)
A study of a particular approach or issue in contemporary criticism and theory, such as feminist theory, gender studies, trauma studies, or migration and diaspora. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 280 or ENG 281 and a prior course in Women's and Gender Studies.
FOCUSED STUDY OF WORLD LITERATURE ENG 470 ENG (4.00 credits)
A study of masterpieces from the Western and/or non-Western traditions, selected for their cultural or literary significance. This course may be organized around a central theme or question, such as the nature of literary tragedy or the role of the individual in the community. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
FOCUSED STUDY: ETHNIC AMERICAN LIT ENG 443 ENG (4.00 credits)
A close examination of a particular ethnic American literary period, genre, or theme, such as the Harlem Renaissance, immigrant narratives, or Asian Americans in popular culture. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
INDEPENDENT STUDY - ENGLISH ENG 478 ENG (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
A program of independent reading/research in a genre, or an author, or a period if a comparable course is not offered in the same year. This program may be one or two semesters in length. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: a literature course at the 300/400 level or consent of instructor.
INDEPENDENT STUDY - ENGLISH ENG 479 ENG (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
A program of independent reading/research in a genre, or an author, or a period if a comparable course is not offered in the same year. This program may be one or two semesters in length. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: a literature course at the 300/400 level or consent of instructor.
INTERNSHIP ENG 490 ENG (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
A planned and faculty-supervised program of work that utilizes skills learned in earlier English course work. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
INTRO TO CREATIVE WRITING ENG 205 BX ENG (4.00 credits)
This is an introductory course for those interested in creative writing. Students will write short stories and/or poetry of their own, and will participate in a peer-review process.  Students will also write short critiques of all student work presented to this writing workshop.  In addition, we will be reading work by established writers.  English 205 is the gateway course to more advanced writing courses in Fiction Writing, Poetry Writing, and other creative-writing courses. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag or concurrent enrollment in W-tag course.
INTRO TO LITERATURE ENG 210 CX ENG (4.00 credits)
Supplies students with the critical tools to analyze, evaluate and appreciate fiction, poetry and drama. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag or concurrent enrollment in W-tag course.
INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM ENG 201 UX ENG (3.00 credits)
Students will learn the basics of newswriting and new-gathering tools, discover the markets for fake news and fact checkers, and explore news platforms from Facebook to the New York Times. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag or concurrent enrollment in W-tag course.
INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES ENG 281 CI ENG (4.00 credits)
An Introduction to the study of Literature focusing on genre, research methods, and critical approaches. In the twenty-first century, navigating the world of interpretation also means learning how to work with information technology, and how to use technological tools for scholarly and creative work. This course substantially concerns itself with contemporary literary and cultural studies in the digital age. Students will not only read about critical digital practices, they will become practitioners of digital information science and critical digital humanities projects. This course thus prepares students in the English major to navigate the cultural and critical modes of the twenty-first century. Digital humanities and critical digital humanities projects and methodologies are now central components of teaching and learning on almost every college and university campus. These are prominent aspects of pedagogy and scholarship in the humanities and are also points of intersection with the humanities and other areas of inquiry. In order to prepare students for the digital-rich environments of our contemporary culture, this course has been developed in collaboration with information science and digital humanities experts on campus, and both programs will provide instruction and expertise in the course as needed to fulfill its ILOs. In this course, students will learn about different approaches to literature, developing an understanding of the critical frameworks that provide the assumptions, strategies, and governing questions for the practice of interpreting texts, at the same time as they make use of the technological tools that are now the everyday reality of literary research and interpretation. Librarians will help guide instruction in information technology tools and methodologies, and students will build projects that make use of critical digital methodologies within a digital humanities platform. This is a gateway course required for English-Literature, English-Writing, and English-Teaching majors. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or W tag.
INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDY ENG 280 CUX ENG (4.00 credits)
Required for all newly-declared English majors. This course provides students with the critical tools needed to perform upper-division literary analysis in English courses. The course defines literary studies and its subfields as scholarly disciplines, reviews fundamentals of literary interpretation, and establishes a timeline of literary periods and movements. Further, the course examines various critical perspectives and theories. Students will develop an understanding of the critical frameworks that provide the assumptions, strategies, and techniques that inform how we read literature for critical interpretation.  Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
ISSUES & THEMES IN LITERATURE ENG 377 C ENG (4.00 credits)
Some of the earliest novels, even before the genre had a name, were fictionalized travel narratives. These novels were read alongside, sometimes interchangeably with, chronicles of real-life experience. Tales of travel and adventure have enjoyed popularity for centuries: they show us the hopes and fears of every era as their denizens venture into the unknown. They reflect a culture's values and prejudices as characters confront both foreignness and their own limitations. What remains to be explored and understood in the literature of our increasingly globalized world? This course will take on a broad historical swath of fiction and non-fiction in an effort to find out. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
ISSUES AND THEMES IN LITERATURE ENG 220 C ENG (4.00 credits)
Each iteration of this course will focus on a particular theme, genre, or issue in literary studies.  Possible topics include Arthurian Legends, Science Fiction, or Political Poetry. Ultimately this course examines the capacity of literature to give voice to cultural concerns and to reflect on and critique cultural questions and problems. Prerequisites: W tag or concurrent enrollment in W-tag course.
JOURNALISM PRACTICUM ENG 202 ENG (2.00 - 4.00 credits)
The overall aim of the practicum is to provide journalism students with the closest approximation possible of working for a professional newspaper, magazine, or other journalistic publication. Students are expected to publish two to four major stories in the college newspaper (depending on the number of credits) assigned or pitched and accepted by editors. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 201.
LANGUAGE SOCIETY AND THE INDIVIDUAL ENG 277 J ENG (4.00 credits)
Students will investigate the different varieties of English and what they mean to the people who speak them. They will reflect on our assumptions and reactions to the language of different groups and search for the source of those reactions. Students will also analyze their language rituals and what role these rituals play in interpersonal relationships. Areas of study will also include the nature of the language faculty, the effects of human interaction on its development, and how language is processed by the brain. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
LIT & CULT OF EARLY TRANSLANTC WORL ENG 416 CGX ENG (4.00 credits)
This advanced course examines transatlantic literature (between Europe, Africa, and the Americas) during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries (specifically, the period of the Enlightenment). Literature of this period reflected radical new social and political realities: 1) Globalization on the heels of the age of exploration 2) the exploitative side of this age and the slave trade 3) focus on writings by and about evolving gender roles. This is a broad topics course that would allow various iterations. The emergence of new literary and cultural forms makes this an especially dynamic period. The study of literature of the period is likewise an especially rich frame for looking at this period because new genres emerged alongside new cultural and political forms. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
LITERARY CRITICISM AND THEORY ENG 380 CUX ENG (4.00 credits)
This course builds on the theoretical principles taught in ENG 280 or ENG 281 to further provide students with the critical tools used in upper-division literature course work. It is devoted to examining critical perspectives and theories in detail, including New Criticism, New Historicism, queer and gender studies, psychoanalytic criticism, feminism, and deconstruction, exploring them through primary readings and case studies. Students will develop a greater understanding of the critical frameworks that provide the assumptions, strategies, and governing questions for the practice of interpreting texts. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 280 or ENG 281.
LITERARY FIGURES ENG 331 CX ENG (4.00 credits)
Concentrated study of a single major author, including literary works, cultural and historical contexts and influences. Possible course offerings include Shakespeare, Chaucer, Milton, Austen, Melville, Shaw, Joyce, Woolf, Twain, Faulkner, and Morrison. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
LITERARY FIGURES: SHAKESPEARE ENG 331B CX ENG (4.00 credits)
Reading and writing about Shakespeare's plays. Selections will include a cross-section of comedies, tragedies, histories, and romances, as well as sonnets and longer poetry. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
LITERARY GENRES ENG 391 ENG (4.00 credits)
A study of literature through the lens of genre, such as the novel, film as literature, contemporary drama or poetry, popular genres, including fantasy or horror. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
MAGAZINE WRITING ENG 301 X ENG (4.00 credits)
Students will read and discuss outstanding examples of magazine writing published in the previous year, then produce four magazine length articles or features of their own modeled on their readings. They will be encouraged to bring their skills up to a professional level and submit their work to our college newspaper, as well as outside publications that fall within their interests. Students will learn proper journalistic organization, diction and attribution, and interviewing techniques. Attention will be devoted to issues of libel law and plagiarism. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 201.
MEDIEVAL LITERATURE ENG 358 CX ENG (4.00 credits)
Works from European literature before 1485. The course may include Old English poetry, Chaucer, the Pearl-poet, Malory, and a variety of writers from non-English traditions. It will also emphasize cultural and linguistic contexts, historical development, and political and economic background. This course contributes to the pre-1865 literature requirement. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
MODERNISM ENG 363 ENG (4.00 credits)
A study of literary modernism during the beginning of the twentieth century that may include emphases on any of the following: the Harlem Renaissance, the relationship between realism and modernism, the gender of modernism, and/or transnational influences on modernist writing. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
PASSING NARR: ETHNIC AM LITERATURE ENG 443A CDQ ENG (4.00 credits)
The term passing refers to the disguises of elements of an individual's presumed "natural" or "essential" identities, such as race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and/or class.  In this course, we will study selected works of various genres (fiction, memoir, and film) which narrate and negotiate acts of passing.  Attending to the intersections of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and sexuality in passing narratives and situating these texts in their historical, cultural, and critical contexts, we will examine the ways in which women and men from diverse ancestries in American literature and culture imagine the possibilities of passing while grappling with its complexities and limitations. We will explore the following key critical questions: What motivates passing, and what are the possibilities, consequences, and limitations of passing? What are the similarities and differences between racial and gender passing? In what ways do passing narratives destabilize the binaries of White/non-White, man/woman, authenticity/counterfeit and call into question the "absoluteness" of identity categories? In what ways does passing remain relevant in today's U.S. cultural and sociopolitical contexts?  Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 110 and sophomore standing.
POETRY WRITING ENG 306 ENG (4.00 credits)
A workshop course for students interested in writing poetry. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 205.
POSTMODERN AND CONTEMPORARY LIT ENG 371 CX ENG (4.00 credits)
This course will discuss postmodern and contemporary themes such as the search for meaning, revisionism, consumerism, community, and the relationship between literature and cultural change. We will look closely at issues of form and genre and will discuss critical terms including magical realism, postcolonialism, and poststructuralism.  Cross-listed: None. Prerequisite: None.
RENAISSANCE LITERATURE ENG 359 CX ENG (4.00 credits)
A selection of works from British literature, ranging from the last years of the fifteenth century, through the Elizabethan age. The course may draw from a wide variety of poetry, drama and prose, including More, Sidney, Spenser, Marlowe and others. It will emphasize literary form and style, as well as cultural and social contexts. This course contributes to the pre-1865 literature requirement. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
RESTORATION & 18TH CENTRY BRIT LIT ENG 361 CX ENG (4.00 credits)
A survey of British literature of the "long 18th century," from the Restoration through the 1700s. Enormous cultural transformations, from the explosion of print culture, to the philosophical and scientific revolutions of the Enlightenment, to experiments in modern democratic thought, to the speed of travel and international trade, mark the era as one of the most turbulent and exciting in Western history. The course will include authors such as Behn, Defoe, Swift, Pope and Johnson. This course contributes to the pre-1865 literature requirement. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
ROMANTIC AND VICTORIAN LITERATURE ENG 362 CX ENG (4.00 credits)
This course examines a selection of literature from the British long nineteenth century, from the late eighteenth century Romantics to the end of the Victorian era in 1901, and may cover a full survey of this period or only one part (e.g. only the Romantic or the Victorian period). Readings may include: John Keats, William Blake, Mary Shelley, Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, Charlotte Bronte, Thomas Hardy, or any of the many other writers of the period. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
SEMINAR IN LITERARY STUDIES ENG 477 ENG (4.00 credits)
A special study of a literary period, figure, genre, or group, of some other special literary focus. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
THM: ROMANTIC,TRANSCENDENTAL,GOTHIC ENG 377A CX ENG (4.00 credits)
This course will look at a let of three literary traditions that overlapped during the late eighteenth and early to mid-nineteenth centuries: Romanticism, Transcendentalism, and Gothicism. These traditions are closely linked to each other: late 18th century British Romanticism gave rise to an American Romantic tradition. Romanticism also gave rise to British as well as American Gothic traditions. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
THM: THE SHAKESPEARE EFFECT ENG 377B CX ENG (4.00 credits)
This course addresses the issue of literary adaptation. Using plays by Shakespeare as case studies, students will examine the way artists in different genres (including film, fiction, and musical theater) adapt and reimagine Shakespeare for different eras and audiences. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
TOPICS IN ETHNIC AMERICAN LIT ENG 325 ENG (4.00 credits)
A study of selected works from one of the following ethnic literary traditions in the United States: African American literature, Asian American literature, Latino/Hispanic American literature, or Native American literature. Cross-listed: ETHS 325. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
TOPICS IN ETHNIC LITERATURES ENG 260 CD ENG (4.00 credits)
A course focusing on the intersection between literature and ethnicity or Ethnic Studies. Specific versions of the course might focus on topics like the Multiethnic Graphic Novel, American Slave Narratives, or the Literature of Immigration. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or concurrent enrollment.
TOPICS IN FILM & LITERATURE ENG 245 C ENG (4.00 credits)
A course focusing on the relationship between film and literature, as well as on the theoretical and critical tools literary studies brings to film analysis. Specific versions of the course might focus on Noir in Film and Fiction, Science Fiction and Fantasy, or Adaptations. Prerequisites: W tag or concurrent enrollment in W-tag course.
TOPICS IN JOURNALISM ENG 312 ENG (3.00 credits)
Topics in journalism, varying by semester. Offerings might include environmental journalism, minority journalism, countercultural journalism, and advocacy journalism, including studies of how subcultures and marginalized interest discourse through media with the constantly changing mainstream in American culture. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
TOPICS IN LITERATURE & ENVIRONMENT ENG 243 CE ENG (4.00 credits)
Concepts of ecology are central to this literature course that might focus on nature writing, utopian and dystopian fictions, indigenous writing, and/or other literary topics that relate to environmental concerns. Students will learn about and employ eco-criticism. Prerequisites: W tag or concurrent enrollment in W-tag course.
TOPICS IN LITERATURE AND GENDER ENG 224 CQ ENG (4.00 credits)
This course focuses on the intersection between literary study and gender and sexuality studies. Different iterations of the course might focus on Women Writing on Love and Power, the LGBTQ Novel, Feminism in Literature, Gender Roles in Genre Fiction, or Transgender Memoirs. Prerequisites: ENG 110 or concurrent enrollment.
TOPICS IN WORLD LITERATURES ENG 271 CG ENG (4.00 credits)
This course focuses on global literatures. Global Anglophone literature and literature in translation might be included. Specific topics could include Diasporic Fiction, Colonial and Postcolonial Writing, Global Drama, or Studies in the Epic. Prerequisites: W tag or concurrent enrollment in W-tag course.
TOPICS:WORLD LITERATURES IN ENGLISH ENG 370 ENG (4.00 credits)
An examination of a particular national literature other than that of the United States or Britain, or a survey of literature by writers from a variety of regions around the globe. Specific courses might include Irish Literature or Postcolonial Literatures. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
TPC: LITERATURE AND GENDER ENG 327 CQ ENG (4.00 credits)
A study of literary works from a variety of periods and genres in relation to issues of gender. Specific iterations of the course could include emphases on gender, sexuality and representation; queer theory; feminist theory, especially feminist narrative theory; textuality and sexuality; women's writing and society; or tough guys in literature. All possible versions of the course will require attention to how literature represents, reinforces, and/or attempts to subvert social roles attached to gender and sexuality. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.
TPC: POSTCOLONIAL FICTION ENG 370B CGX ENG (4.00 credits)
This course will provide students with an opportunity to explore fiction from the former British colonies and from Great Britain itself. In order to experience the literature of this course as fully as possible, our readings of the primary texts will be informed by historical grounding, geographical/political contexts, as well as cultural and literary theory to do with postcolonial subjectivity. How do we, in North America, read the work of those in other parts of the world and learn from what they have to tell us? Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag.